Case Study of Guatemalan Coffee Farmers Associations

As a result from her internship with the  Conflict and Development Foundation, Taya Brown, a PhD Student in Horticultural Sciences at Texas A&M University, is now conducting a Case Study in Guatemala. She is using a participatory action research approach to gain a comprehensive understanding of the history and current state of affairs of selected coffee cooperatives in Yepocapa, Chimaltenango. 

Through this doctoral research, she will continue to collect data for CDF and the Conflict and Development Center at Texas A&M University on conflict-related issues regarding coffee theft and migration by including conflict-related questions in her focus groups. The area in which she is working at (Yepocapa) is one of the target areas in which Texas A&M conducted coffee improvement programs and established a coffee washing station through a USDA-funded Food for Progress project a few years ago.

QPM Promotion through Social Marketing in Guatemala

Project Name: National Promotion of Quality Protein Maize (QPM) through Social Marketing in Guatemala
Monthly Update: July 2017
Prepared By: Rachel Abbott, Partnerships Coordinator, Semilla Nueva

Project Summary
With support from The Conflict and Development Foundation, Semilla Nueva is expanding the consumption of biofortified crops in Guatemala through an innovative social marketing approach. This is the beginning of a second phase geared toward seed purchase and seed saving in the pacific coastal regions of Guatemala. The project has two components: 1) work with a partner organization to design and launch an introductory social marketing campaign to promote planting QPM, and 2) expand on previous work done in the southern coast, ensuring that families save, store and replant QPM harvested in 2016 for the 2017 season.

Monthly Update
In July, the field team continued caring for corn demonstration parcels that were planted with our innovative brand name Fortaleza 3. Semilla Nueva is planning to hold farmer field day events promoting the seed in these demonstration sites. The majority of these events will take place during harvests in late August-early September. The marketing team finalized the design of promotional materials, including seed bags. Finally, the marketing team completed the design of the quantitative marketing survey that will be conducted in the eastern and northern regions of Guatemala in August. The survey will determine farmer motivators and barriers to planting our seed, and will be used to define marketing strategies in those regions.

During this month, CDF Program Manager Johanna Roman invited Semilla Nueva to offer a presentation at the USAID Mission in Guatemala, to present an update of program activities.  

Youth Development in El Salvador through Hydroponic Gardens

 Through this project, hydroponic gardens have been established in six target communities. 

Through this project, hydroponic gardens have been established in six target communities. 

The Conflict and Development Foundation (CDF) and Food for the Poor (FFTP) are studying the impact of an agricultural and nutritional innovation – the use of semi-urban hydroponic gardens to produce leafy vegetables – in violence reduction and keeping youth out of gangs in El Salvador. The study is being conducted in six communities in Ciudad Delgado with high incidence of violence and gang presence. FFTP is working with its counterpart in El Salvador, the New Horizons for the Poor Foundation, to complete program activities. 

Objectives of the Study: This study will seek to: (a) collect data on the inter-relationship between youth malnutrition, school desertion, and gang recruitment in the target communities; (b) identify the main types of violence affecting youth in the target communities; and (c) determine if participating in the semi-urban hydroponic gardening project and complementary social and cultural inclusion activities has an effect on reducing youth violence activities and gang involvement. 

Systems Thinking Nutrition Program - Guatemala

Project: The Stabilization of Marginalized Communities in Guatemala via Food and Nutrition Security on Child Stunting: Employing Systems Thinking Tools - December 2016 Progress Report

The Conflict and Development Foundation and the Center on Conflict and Development at Texas A&M University are pleased to collaborate with Lee Voth-Gaeddert of the Missouri University of Science and Technology in this project that will produce a novel approach and unique tool to improve access to information on food security and water, sanitation and hygiene issues in marginalized communities in Guatemala.

 

Social Campaign promoting "Fortaleza" in Guatemala

Dec 2016 Progress Report on our collaborative Quality Protein Maize program in Guatemala

Project Name: National Promotion of Quality Protein Maize (QPM) through Social Marketing in Guatemala
Dates Covered by this Report: December 1-31, 2016
Report Prepared By: Kendall Banks, Director of Monitoring, Evaluation and Development, Semilla Nueva


Project Summary
The Conflict and Development Foundation's partner, Semilla Nueva, is using an innovative   social marketing approach to promote planting Quality Protein Maize (QPM) in Guatemala, and ensure that families save, store and replant QPM harvested in 2016 for the 2017 season.

Socioeconomic Study of Smallholder Guatemalan Coffee Farmers

Conflict and Development Foundation Internship Report: 

Socioeconomic Study of Smallholder Guatemalan Coffee Farmers Affected by Coffee Leaf Rust Disorder

Intern: Taya Brown,  PhD Student in Horticultural Sciences at Texas A&M University

Project site: San Pedro Yepocapa, Chimaltenango, Guatemala

coffeebeans.jpg

 

 

Research Objectives and Conflict Component:

The objective of my research is to provide evaluation of decision-making and socioeconomic gains made by small-scale coffee farmers as a result of receiving and implementing the new CLR-resistant coffee hybrid, “Centroamerica.” Through the World Coffee Research project titled “Sustainable incomes through coffee farming improvement project” six coffee farming cooperatives in San Pedro Yepocapa, Guatemala have been selected to receive enough plantlets to replant 1/6 of a hectare of their land in the new hybrid. These particular farmers were selected as participants because of the dramatic impact they felt from the recent CLR epidemic, both because this area was one of the worst hit and because coffee production is the main source of income in this region. Farmers in this area suffered unspeakably during Guatemala’s civil war. Their resilience and strength is now being tested during the post-conflict era and they continue to experience uncertainty due to the CLR crisis. A high percentage of growers are impoverished and civil conflict has been a very recent threat (at an average age of 55 years old, extreme conflict is well within the lifetime of most coffee farmers alive today). Access to resources is low in Yepocapa and therefore improvements in management techniques are extremely slow to actualize, while high altitudes, lack of access to varied markets and poor soil quality constrain their ability to diversify. 

Click on the link provided above to learn more about this research program. 

 

Women Empowerment Study - Guatemala

Dec 2016 Progress Report on Research Program:

Enhancing Livelihood and Incomes of Rural Women through Postharvest Technology, Phase II

Partner: Asociación de Desarrollo Integral Pueblos Hermanos, Guatemala (ADIPH)

 Progress Report – Dec. 2016

PI: Carlos Collado, Technical Coordinator, ALIAR

Project Manager: Johanna Roman, Program Manager, Conflict and Development Foundation  

Background: Phase I of this Transformative Solutions program funded by Texas A&M University’s Center on Conflict and Development (ConDev) had the objective of testing an innovation to empower rural women through agricultural technology. Mayan women working at three fruit and vegetable packing centers used modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) to process pre-washed fruits and vegetables. ConDev researchers are analyzing data to determine if employment at these centers increased the bargaining power of women in the household and made them less prone to abuse in the society.

Objectives of Phase II: This activity will produce research that identifies the relationship between women who work in vegetable packing centers, their decision-making ability in their households, and likelihood of violence committed against them.

Research Methodology: Data will be obtained through randomized sampling of 250-300 women working at a selected vegetable packing center and 250-300 non-working women in the City of Chichicastenango, in the Department of El Quiché. Women in these communities are vulnerable due to high levels of unemployment, social and economic marginalization, and lack of education. In addition, they suffer from inequality, poverty, and hunger.

 Main Project Activities:

1.       Data collection activities are underway at the vegetable packing center operated by Asociación Santo Tomás located in Chichicastenango, Quiché.

2.       Conducted meetings with legal representatives of farmer organizations that are participating in this program.

3.       Survey instruments have been validated. Working and non-working women are completingbaseline surveys developed by the Center on Conflict and Development at Texas A&M University.

4.       The data coding process is being developed.

5.       International marketing support activities have been conducted. Potential buyers from Fruit Consutling Europe B.V. visited our target packing centers to evaluate their packaged products. Also, food safety training programs were conducted in partnership with the Republic of Taiwan and the Ministry of Agriculture. Product samples (in Modified Atmosphere Packaging) were sent to the USA.

6.       Meetings with local retailers and Guatemalan supermarkets interested in MAP products were held. Visits to local supermarkets were held to explore the variety of packaged vegetables available in refrigerated stands.

7.       ALIAR is working with the National Agricultural Products Exporters Association (AGEXPORT) to introduce their MAP products into European markets in February 2017.
 
                          

  Types of packaging systems for fresh produce being displayed in Guatemalan supermarkets. Our project promotes the use of innovative Modified Atmosphere Packaging (MAP) that increases shelf-life while retaining product quality.

Types of packaging systems for fresh produce being displayed in Guatemalan supermarkets. Our project promotes the use of innovative Modified Atmosphere Packaging (MAP) that increases shelf-life while retaining product quality.

 Our project’s Technical Coordinator Carlos Collado presenting information to retailers on the shelf-life advantages of packing fresh produce using Modified Atmosphere Packaging (MAP)

Our project’s Technical Coordinator Carlos Collado presenting information to retailers on the shelf-life advantages of packing fresh produce using Modified Atmosphere Packaging (MAP)

Systems Thinking Tool - Guatemala Project Report

The Conflict and Development Foundation and the Center on Conflict and Development at Texas A&M University are pleased to collaborate with Lee Voth-Gaeddert of the Missouri University of Science and Technology in this project that will produce a novel approach and unique tool to improve access to information on food security and water, sanitation and hygiene issues in marginalized communities in Guatemala.